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Toolkit 2017: Virtual and Augmented Reality

The advertising marketplace has become cluttered, making cut through more difficult than ever. Add to this, consumers' increasing tendencies to opt out of marketing and you can see the growing value of brand experiences which can penetrate. Two technologies - virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) – are helping brands such as Facebook, Google and Samsung deliver those experiences.


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Published by WARC
on 24 Apr 2017

Toolkit 2017: Virtual and Augmented Reality

The advertising marketplace has become cluttered, making cut through more difficult than ever. Add to this, consumers' increasing tendencies to opt out of marketing and you can see the growing value of brand experiences which can penetrate. Two technologies - virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) – are helping brands such as Facebook, Google and Samsung deliver those experiences. Taken from the Warc Toolkit (in association with Deloitte Digital), what are the brand experience trends to be aware of in 2017?

1. Many brands have reconsidered AR because of Pokémon GO

Launched in July 2016, Pokémon GO's downloads reached 50 million installations before the end of the month. Its popularity was a tipping point for AR in marketing. There are two major AR opportunities. Piggyback on AR properties that are already popular - like Pokémon GO - or formulate bespoke, branded experiences.

2. VR is a vehicle for storytelling and high-end experiences

VR in marketing went mainstream in 2016. Many high-power devices moved on to the market and the dominance of smartphones has made high-power display widely available. Brands are already sharing immersive experiences with customers that provide a sensory overload and block out distractions from TV, websites and apps. However, should VR be used to complement or replace reach-based campaigns?

3. Research confirms VR’s potential for emotional engagement

Ad tech firm YuMe and research firm Nielsen used neuroscience techniques to gauge emotional responses to content experienced in three distinct environments: an immersive VR experience on a headset, a 360-degree video on a tablet, and video on a conventional, flat screen TV. VR elicited 27% higher emotional engagement than in a 2D environment and 17% higher than the flat screen video.

For more on VR and AR trends including AR in product trials, consumer engagement and VR opportunities tying brands with influencers, download the summary.

  • Pokémon GO's downloads reached 50 million installations faster than any other game with in-app revenue estimated at $200 million
  • The global virtual reality headwear market is forecast be worth US$2.8billion by 2020

Case studies featured in this chapter

Pepsi Max sought to regain relevance in the UK with a content-led AR strategy to build sales
Pepsi Max’s “Unbelievable” campaign delivered hero films portraying impossible situations come true, including a celebrity magician hovering on YouTube, supported through social, digital, OOH, and POS ads. The AR ‘stunts’ generated press coverage and helped generate £54 million in sales revenue.

Lockheed Martin launched a large-scale VR experience for school children
Lockheed Martin needed to attract young engineers to its business. To generate interest, the security and aerospace company used a VR-enabled school bus so children could experience a virtual trip to Mars.

In association with:

Deloitte Digital

Last Modified Date: 30 Mar 2018